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Symposia

Host-pathogen interactions I – plants
08/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Kenichi Tsuda Kenichi Tsuda (DE)
Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research
Olga Valentova Olga Valentova (CZ)

Plants are sessile organisms living in complex environments in which they are continuously exposed to a broad range of microbial pathogens. The evolutionary arms race between plants and their attackers has provided plants with a highly sophisticated defense system that, like the animal innate immune system, recognizes pathogen molecules and responds by activating specific defenses that are directed against the invader.
Structural bioinformatics for drug design and biotechnology
08/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Ruben Abagyan Ruben Abagyan (US)
San Diego Supercomputer Center
Jaroslav	Koca Jaroslav Koca (CZ)

Extracting proper information from large data has become not only a serious problem of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), which produces an enormous amount of data, but also a difficult task for 3D molecular databases, as the amount of such data is increasing dramatically as well. The discipline that focuses on this task is called ‘Structural bioinformatics’. The symposium will show how 3D data are generated and further elaborated, and then can be used to bring new information for metabolomics or to help the design of new drugs.
Protein complexes and networks
08/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Marek Šebela Marek Šebela (CZ)
Palacky University in Olomouc
TBA TBA
Biological processes often involve protein complexes such as multimeric enzymes, DNA-binding protein clusters or signaling protein cascades with a dynamic and reversible association or dissociation of their components depending on the actual needs. Such complexes require an orchestrated regulation, for example with respect to interactions with ligands, post-translational modifications and alterations in composition and architecture. To understand the whole cellular organization, it is necessary to identify, quantify and characterize proteins and their relationships within functional networks, which is affordable by combining efficient separation strategies and bioanalytical methods showing a high resolving power, accuracy and sensitivity.
Carcinogenesis
08/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
David H Phillips David H Phillips (UK)
King's College London
Marie Stiborova Marie Stiborova (CZ)

The symposium will highlight recent advances in mechanisms essential for carcinogenesis including mainly the aspects involved in its development. The role of new genetic pathways in cancer biochemistry (the genome mutation profiles), the identification of the key targets and their validation, as well as utilization of new knock-out or knock-in animal models for such studies are among topics that will be discussed.
Emerging roles of noncoding RNAs
08/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Dónal O'Carroll Dónal O'Carroll (UK)
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Edinburgh
Stepanka Vanacova Stepanka Vanacova (CZ)

RNA-based gene regulation is revealing itself as key to understanding cellular function, organismal development and homeostasis. Eukaryotic cells produce diverse types of protein-coding and noncoding RNAs, some of which have a direct role in the regulation of gene expression. The session will cover exciting new developments in this field from ncRNA-mediated regulation of chromatin structure, through the role of ncRNAs in mammalian development to the elaborate mechanisms of ncRNAs in viral infection and replication.
Xenobiochemistry and drug metabolism
08/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
F. Peter Guengerich F. Peter Guengerich (US)
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville
Vaclav Martínek Vaclav Martínek (CZ)

The symposium will focus on the roles of the major enzymes participating in metabolism of xenobiotics including carcinogens and drugs – the membrane monooxygenase systems containing cytochromes P450 – and highlight the key advances in their mechanisms of action at the molecular level. The novel roles of individual enzyme components of this enzyme system on its reaction cycle found by studies based both on experimental and on theoretical approaches will be discussed. New aspects essential for their biotechnological applications will be presented as well.
Chromosome structure and segregation
08/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
William C. Earnshaw William C. Earnshaw (UK)
Wellcome Centre for Cell Biology. University of Edinburgh
Ondřej Seda Ondřej Seda (CZ)

Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division is critical for genetic stability, and defects can lead to cancer and birth defects. In this symposium we will discuss how a range of experimental systems, including maize, Drosophila and vertebrate cells, and various techniques from Hi-C to classical genetics to cell biology, are used to explore the structure of condensed chromosomes in dividing cells and to functionally characterize some of the protein factors that direct their assembly and segregation.
Host-pathogen interaction II - pathogen and parasite
08/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Franz X. Heinz Franz X. Heinz (AT)
Medical University of Vienna
Libor Grubhoffer Libor Grubhoffer (CZ)

The symposium will cover topical subjects of molecular vector and infectious disease biology, encompassing viral and bacterial pathogens as well as eukaryotic unicellular or metazoan parasitic organisms transmitted by blood-sucking arthropods/vectors. The invited lectures will feature tick-borne encephalilits virus (TBEV), spirochetes of Lyme borreliosis (LB), Anaplasma phagocytophilum and African trypanosomes and their molecular interactions at the interface with the hosts/vectors.
Computational biology
08/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Janet Thornton Janet Thornton (UK)
EMBL-EBI, Hinxton
Jaroslav Koca Jaroslav Koca (CZ)

Computational biology of today is a broad discipline that helps to bridge the world of single molecules and molecular assemblies with understanding biological processes in living systems at atomic level. Computational biology operates with a variety of tools on different levels of complexity, starting with very strict and algorithmic approaches like molecular simulations and finishing with statistical and heuristic techniques. This symposium will attempt to show some of these techniques focused on systems of different level of complexity including proteins, proteins/nucleic acids complexes and cell membranes.
Epitranscriptome
08/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Mary O ´Connel Mary O ´Connel (CZ)
Masaryk University, Brno
Stepanka Vanacova Stepanka Vanacova (CZ)

RNA modifications and stability play key roles at both the cellular and the organismal level. They are crucial for the correct timing of developmental processes, proliferation and/or reaction to external stimuli such as pathogens or diverse stresses. Moreover, several human genetic disorders relate to abnormalities in RNA modifications. Major advancements in understanding the role of both internal as well as terminal RNA modifications in mammalian and invertebrate organisms will be presented and discussed.
Bioluminescence: chemistry, enzymatics, applications
08/07/2018
17:30 – 18:30h
Host-pathogen III - molecular virology and viral vectors
09/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Wesley I. Sundquist Wesley I. Sundquist (US)
University of Utah School of Medicine Salt Lake City
Tomas Ruml Tomas Ruml (CZ)

Virology is being constantly challenged with occasional outbreaks of hazardous viral infections, occurrence of newly emerging viruses and persistent infections. To name some of them, HIV, influenza, dengue, Ebola and recently Zika may be mentioned. The symposium will turn its attention to some of these problems, as well as the use of virus-based vectors in gene therapy and molecular biology.
Dysregulation of metal homeostasis and neurodegeneration
09/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
David Devos David Devos (FR)
Université, Faculté de Médecine, CHU de Lille
Tomas Zima Tomas Zima (CZ)

Environmental exposure to heavy metals and dysregulation of iron, copper and other metal homeostasis may contribute to pathomechanisms of neurodegeneration. Neuroinflammation and ferroptosis were identified as key molecular pathways underlying iron toxicity. Recent developments in analytical tools such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy online with high performance liquid chromatography, X-ray fluorescence mapping or quantitative susceptibility mapping with magnetic resonance imaging have enabled outstanding analytic sensitivity and specificity in detecting metal elements in biological fluids and tissues. Conservative iron chelation is currently being tested in several clinical trials of Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Omics technologies
09/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Marek Šebela Marek Šebela (Cz)
Palacky University in Olomouc
TBA TBA
Large-scale and effective studies of biological molecules with a different structural basis such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids and numerous metabolites (including e.g. fatty acids, amino acids, purines, pyrimidines or steroids) is currently highly attractive because of the availability of modern instruments and tools for both separation and analysis (2-D chromatographs, capillary electrophoresis systems, microfluidics, mass spectrometers, powerful NMR spectrometers, DNA/RNA arrays and others). The development of genomics since the 1980s has continuously been accompanied by introducing proteomics, transcriptomics, glycomics, lipidomics, metabolomics and other omics technologies, which are centered to complex samples to generate huge datasets for extracting answers to many biological questions related to physiological as well as pathological processes.
Biochemical processes at cellular membranes
09/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Matthew Freeman Matthew Freeman (UK)
Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford
Kvido Strisovsky Kvido Strisovsky (CZ)

Biochemical reactions that are responsible for the metabolism of living organisms do not proceed in a test tube: most of them take place in a confined space of a cell, on or even within a biological membrane. Almost a third of all proteins coded by the human genome are membrane proteins. The symposium will cover this fascinating and often neglected field from lipid biology and phosphoinositide signaling to membrane transport and intramembrane enzymes.
RNA synthesis and processing / mRNA homeosthasis
09/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Torben Heick Jensen Torben Heick Jensen (DK)
Centre for mRNP Biogenesis and Metabolism, Aarhus
Radim Cerny Radim Cerny (CZ)

RNA synthesis and metabolism are regulated and tightly controlled at multiple levels. RNA production is balanced by RNA trimming and degradation, and it is this interplay that maintains a proper RNA homeostasis and allows cells to respond to new stimuli. The session will cover current understanding of how cells regulate and monitor the production and turnover of coding and noncoding RNAs.
Nucleic acids and nucleotides and the DNA world
09/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Thomas Carell Thomas Carell (DE)
Department für Chemie, LMU München
Michal Hocek Michal Hocek (CZ)

Nucleic acids are not only key molecules for the storage, replication and transcription of genetic information, but also serve as enzymes or regulators of a number of cell processes. This symposium features several topics including extension of the genetic alphabet, selection of aptamers or DNAzymes, as well as studies in DNA and RNA epigenetics.
Structural biology I
09/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Marcin Nowotny Marcin Nowotny (PL)
International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Warsaw
Pavlina Rezacova Pavlina Rezacova (CZ)

Information on the 3-dimensional structure of biomolecules is critical for the understanding of their function. The two symposia on this topic will overview recent developments in the elucidation of DNA and protein structure by X-ray diffraction, NMR and cryoelectron microscopy.
Biochemistry and tailored therapy of cardiometabolic diseases
09/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Piero Pontincasa Piero Pontincasa (IT)
University "Aldo Moro" of Bari Medical School
Jan	Kopecký Jan Kopecký (CZ)

Cardiometabolic diseases remain a major health threat, especially due to unfavorable lifestyle changes, as well as advanced population aging. Recent progress in biochemistry and pathophysiology has enabled search for novel diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets to improve cardiovascular outcomes globally.
Systems biology
09/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Thomas Höfer Thomas Höfer (DE)
BioQuant and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg
Pavel Martasek Pavel Martasek (CZ)

Despite major developments in biomedical science, biological complexity cannot be quantified because the vast majority of ongoing research is focused on a specific subject or hierarchy. To fully comprehend the challenge of systems biology we need to think beyond piecemeal approaches and instead seek information regarding the multiscale organizational networks that drive an organism to thrive and adapt to any environmental niche. This session will offer insights into the latest advances that have poised the field to make the next leap.
Synthetic biology
10/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Philipp Holliger Philipp Holliger (UK)
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge
Michal Hocek Michal Hocek (CZ)

Synthetic biology is a branch of science that combines chemistry and biology for the construction of modified biomolecules, artificial biological systems or even whole organisms. This symposium brings together a sample of researchers representing different approaches in synthetic biology, from in vitro and in vivo incorporation of non-coded amino acids into proteins to DNA switches and chemical epigenetics.
Proteases in cancer pathogenesis and immunity
10/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Joerg  W. Bartsch Joerg W. Bartsch (DE)
Philipps-University Marburg
Aleksi Sedo Aleksi Sedo (CZ)

Proteases are not just the simple protein-degrading enzymes that we know from textbooks. They also can play very complex regulatory roles in the cell cycle control, cell migration, inflammation or apoptosis. This session will overview some of the numerous activities that the proteolytic enzymes have in cancer development and immunity control.
Glycans in health and diseases I
10/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
James Paulson James Paulson (US)
The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla
Michaela Wimmerova Michaela Wimmerova (CZ)

Glycans are ubiquitous components of living organisms, playing a crucial role in various biological processes such as cell adhesion, molecular trafficking and clearance, receptor activation, fertilization, differentiation, signal transduction or endocytosis. Variable and dynamic glycosylations accompanied by specific protein–carbohydrate interactions are important for cell–cell communication and recognition processes by the immune systems, with implications in  cancerogenesis, metastases or host–pathogen interactions. Some of these aspects will be touched on in the two symposia on ‘Glycans in health and diseases.
Biotechnology
10/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Edward A.  Bayer Edward A. Bayer (IL)
The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot
Petr	Novak Petr Novak (CZ)

Biotechnology covers many multidisciplinary fields and often provides breakthrough products for various uses in our modern society to make our life better and help us to meet society´s challenges. In the Biotechnology session several exciting research topics and their recent advances will be presented by eminent scientists in this area.
Structural biology II
10/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Richard Bayliss Richard Bayliss (UK)
Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology. University of Leeds
Vaclav Veverka Vaclav Veverka (CZ)

Information on the 3-dimensional structure of biomolecules is critical for the understanding of their function. The two symposia on this topic will overview recent developments in the elucidation of DNA and protein structure by X-ray diffraction, NMR and cryoelectron microscopy.
Nanoworld
10/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Dieter Scharnweber Dieter Scharnweber (DE)
Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Technische Universität Dresden
Marie Hubalek Kalbacova Marie Hubalek Kalbacova (CZ)

Biological molecules are in themselves nanostructures that interact with other nanostructural players, either in solution or as part of a macromolecular assembly or a cell’s sensory system. This session will focus not only on their use as building blocks in engineering approaches, but also on the molecular structure property profiles of such interactions and their biological consequences, ranging from sensory to therapeutic issues.
Photosynthesis
10/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Nathan Nelson Nathan Nelson (IL)
Tel Aviv University
Josef Komenda Josef Komenda (CZ)

Photosynthesis is the key biochemical process essential for maintenance of life on Earth in the form we presently experience. The symposium lectures given by renowned specialists in the field will focus on recent progress in the knowledge of structure, biogenesis and function of important pigment–protein complexes participating in oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis.
Biological effects of gaseous molecules
10/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Asif Ahmed Asif Ahmed (UK)
Aston University, Birmingham
Libor Vitek Libor Vitek (CZ)

Since the recent discovery of tremendous biological effects of nitric oxide, other small gaseous molecules such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen sulfide have emerged to be similarly important in cell signaling, with a great impact on pathophysiology of various diseases. These novel data have substantial therapeutic potential and are just starting to be translated into clinical medicine.
Glycans in health and diseases II
10/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Anne Imberty Anne Imberty (FR)
Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales, Grenoble
Michaela Wimmerova Michaela Wimmerova (CZ)

Glycans are ubiquitous components of living organisms, playing a crucial role in various biological processes such as cell adhesion, molecular trafficking and clearance, receptor activation, fertilization, differentiation, signal transduction or endocytosis. Variable and dynamic glycosylations accompanied by specific protein–carbohydrate interactions are important for cell–cell communication and recognition processes by the immune systems, with implications in  cancerogenesis, metastases or host–pathogen interactions. Some of these aspects will be touched on in the two symposia on ‘Glycans in health and diseases’.
Redox biochemistry and signaling
11/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Peter Nagy Peter Nagy (HU)
National Institute of Oncology, Budapest
Viktor Kozich Viktor Kozich (CZ)

Reactive sulfur species are central players in redox biology. Historically, the focus was on the antioxidant properties of Cys-residues, primarily in glutathione (GSH), to alleviate oxidative stress-induced damage, followed by establishing redox sensing as a key component of cellular adaptation to stress. Today, thiol-based redox events are considered essential for most aspects of cellular physiology, including enzyme catalysis, protein structure, and intramolecular gating processes (‘redox switches’). Research over the past two decades have shown that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a small signaling molecule, has a versatile role in orchestrating redox signaling and protection against oxidative stress. Recent discoveries characterized persulfide/polysulfide formation on Cys thiols as a major player in these processes. The main aim of this symposium is to provide insights into recent advances on the path to reconciling this integrated network of thiol-based redox regulation.
Plant signalling and behaviour
11/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Frantisek Baluska Frantisek Baluska (DE)
Institute of Cellular and Molecular Botany. University of Bonn
Olga Valentova Olga Valentova (CZ)

Plants live in complex environments, being continuously exposed to a broad range of stimuli, and their survival is dependent on the reliable sampling of critical biotic and abiotic parameters. Plant-specific sensory systems are used to sample more than 20 different such parameters from a plant’s environment and integrate the complex sensory information so that the plant can respond to the outside world via metabolic, physiological and behavioral adaptations essential for survival. To achieve this goal via optimization of their Darwinian fitness, plants use their own plant-specific intelligence, cognition and behavior.
Stem cells epigenetics
11/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Eran Meshorer Eran Meshorer (IL)
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Eva	Bartova Eva Bartova (CZ)

Pluripotent embryonic stem cells have the dual capacity to differentiate into all cell types and to self-renew. As such, they provide excellent models for development, differentiation, and disease modeling, as well as great promise for regenerative medicine. Chromatin structure and function as well as epigenetic processes play key roles in regulating pluripotency and early differentiation events. This session will cover different epigenetic aspects of pluripotency and stem cell differentiation.
Combinatorial approaches in chemistry and biology
11/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Alexander G. Gabibov Alexander G. Gabibov (RU)
Shemyakin & Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow
Richard Lerner Richard Lerner (US)
Scripps Research Institute, CA, USA

Combinatorial Chemistry and Biology became a hallmark of the modern life science. The central idea is that by imputing very large numbers of different molecules into evolution-based selection systems the very long times used in natural evolution might be obviated. This approach is referred as “the chemistry of very large numbers”.  For these purposes screening platforms with microfluidic ultrahigh-throughput screening (uHTS) techniques to identify the unique functionality from millions of variants where developed. To mimic the natural selection mechanisms that occur by compartmentalization in vivo, the developed technique based on single-cell encapsulation in droplets systems where designed. This facilitated the isolation of different clones of biological species with different functionalities, namely for screening microbiota, biocatalytic clones, antibody diversity and specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). From the other hand the diversity of chemical synthesis was powered by genetics by constructing of a vast collection of molecules where each one carried a unique DNA tag that encoded its synthetic history.

Integrated structural biology for traslational research
11/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Genome dynamics and stability I
11/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Roland Foisner Roland Foisner (AT)
Medical University Vienna
Ivan	Raska Ivan Raska (CZ)

The eukaryotic genome is organized in a hierarchical manner, which allows its dynamic spatiotemporal organization during development to ensure tissue-specific gene expression at the correct time and place.  This symposium explores the organization principles of chromatin within the 3-dimensional space of the nucleus at structural, biochemical and (epi-)genetic levels, as well as how this organization is coupled to replication, cell differentiation, DNA damage repair and disease states.
3D genome
11/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Sergey V. Razin Sergey V. Razin (RU)

Yegor Vassetzky Yegor Vassetzky (FR)

Recent studies have demonstrated that the spatial organization of the genome within the eukaryotic cell nucleus is functionally relevant. However, the mechanisms supporting this organization remain largely obscure. Furthermore, it becomes increasingly evident that genome architecture varies significantly in individual cells and that many known features of genome folding, such as partitioning of chromosomes into topologically-associating domains, represent a population average. Consequently, the necessity to focus studies on individual cells rather than cell population, and hence to develop appropriate experimental approaches, becomes more and more evident. These topics will be discussed at the symposium on 3D genome.
Plant biochemistry and molecular biology
11/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Josef Šamaj Josef Šamaj (CZ)
Palacký University Olomouc
Holger Puchta Holger Puchta (DE)

In this session we will present advanced emerging technologies in current molecular and cellular plant biology research such as new bioimaging methods and CRISPR/Cas-based genome editing. We will also discuss new discoveries in the field of plant aquaporins and signalling through mitogen-activated protein kinases.
Extracellular matrix
11/07/2018
15:30 – 17:30h
Bernhard Ganss Bernhard Ganss (CA)
University of Toronto
Radim Cerny Radim Cerny (CZ)

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, and provides not only essential physical scaffolding for the cellular constituents but also initiates crucial biochemical and biomechanical cues that are required for tissue morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis. Basic functions such as movement or nutrition are mainly mediated by ECM-rich organs (bones, tendons and muscles, cartilages, teeth). The symposium will summarize new aspects of tooth enamel production, collagen fibrils formation, the role of glycosaminoglycans and their interaction with proteins, and the tissue engineering of cartilage and bone.
Lipidomics
12/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Jana Hajšlová Jana Hajšlová (CZ)
Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague
Tomas Ruml Tomas Ruml (CZ)

Lipids play an indisputable physiological role in all organisms. Numerous human diseases, including cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, result from dysregulation of pathways involved in lipid metabolism. Due to recent enormous advancement of analytical methodology combined with bioinformatics, lipidomics has become a powerful discipline that may significantly deepen our understanding of the biological functions of lipids and their roles in human pathogenesis.
Genome dynamics and stability II
12/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Yosef Gruenbaum Yosef Gruenbaum (IL)
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Ivan	Raska Ivan Raska (CZ)

The eukaryotic genome is organized in a hierarchical manner, which allows its dynamic spatiotemporal organization during development to ensure tissue-specific gene expression at the correct time and place.  This symposium explores the organization principles of chromatin within the 3-dimensional space of the nucleus at structural, biochemical and (epi-)genetic levels, as well as how this organization is coupled to replication, cell differentiation, DNA damage repair and disease states.
Natural biologically active compounds in environment and foods
12/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Cathie Martin Cathie Martin (UK)
John Innes Centre, Norwich
Tomas Macek Tomas Macek (CZ)

The food chain is one of the most important interfaces between the environment and humans. Biologically active compounds are an inseparable part of our diet, including the naturally occurring ones as well as those introduced into the environment by human activities. Certain compounds from both groups represent a major threat to the health of the human population. In this session, benefits of a colourful diet will be discussed along with approaches to suppress toxins in crops, lower the uptake of xenobiotics and enhance nutritional values of foods by engineering approaches.
Protein N-terminal modifications: from proteome to therapy
12/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Virtually all eukaryotic proteins are modified at their amino-termini by enzymes that in coordination attach or remove small molecules at the first residue. Surprisingly, despite their prevalence, the roles of protein amino-terminal modifications (NTMs) are only recently emerging. This symposium will cover the basic mechanisms of NTMs and the modifying enzymes, as well as the impact of NTMs on protein function, cellular and organismal biology and disease.

Organizers: Carmela Giglione (FR), CNRS - I2BC; Rafael Aldabe (ES), CIMA - University of Navarra; Thomas Arnesen (NO), University of Bergen
Scientific (mis)conduct: how to detect (and avoid) bad science
12/07/2018
09:00 – 11:00h
Mariusz Jaskolski Mariusz Jaskolski (PL)

Alex Wlodawer Alex Wlodawer (US)

The Session will feature lectures by colleagues regarded as authorities in the thankless but self-purifying role of tracking and correcting suboptimal research. Examples will highlight irreproducible results, wishful thinking combined with corrupt epistemology, fabrication of data, and the role of mentoring and supervision, as well as of journal editors and reviewers. The session will be concluded with a general discussion involving the audience.

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